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20131202
20131210
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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12
. >> sarah, our resident religion expert at the table, you have a religious unpopular -- >> i have a related unpopular opinion to sahil's, which is that politicians should stop talking about religion, god and the bible. >> so -- >> people would be less -- public polly would icy would be less on -- >> why is in no safe zone in politics? >> 20% of the american public is not affiliated with a particular religion. there is a smaller segment of those who are atheist than agnostic. still, as he points out, it is kind of amazing that given the rise in the number of american atheists and nonbelievers there is not a single one in the u.s. congress and that it would be poison to run and openly declare you're an atheist. look at mark pryor's ad where he talked about the bible and he doesn't have all the answers, only god has all the answers. it is, like, well, if you don't have answers, why are you running for office? >> but flip it around, though. there has to be some -- to an elected official who sincerely believes in higher power, practices their faith, there has to be some civic value in that too,
no country from morocco to pakistan in which christians can freely practice their religion, end of quote. he continued, quote, there is a severe danger as we start to celebrate the feast of christmas in this country that all christianity will be almost completely erased from the traditional middle east holy land of the bible. mary to uld not take egypt because jesus would not have been safe there today. to follow on sir baldry's line of thinking, the patriarch abraham would also have a difficult time surviving in iraq having come from er, which is now nasiriyah. jonah would be hard pressed to make it to naviniva, which is now in the most you will area, and paul could scarcely travel the road to demascus in syria. the debate in the house of commons began with a staggering statistic, namely that one christian is killed every 11 minutes somewhere on earth for their faith. one christian is killed every 11 minutes somewhere on earth for their faith. the focus of the commons debate was on the persecution of christians, several noted that whether or not you are a person of faith, all should be conc
gender identity like race, sex and religion. >> it's a broad array of people whose gender identitity is different from their sex. >> reporter: a gender nonconformist. >> in the state of maryland, you are not protected on gender identity. what good is it if someone can fire me for looking the way i do but not who i love? >> reporter: they passed a bill that makes discrimination against the wall. >> hyattsville is the first jurisdiction to pass the legislation. >> reporter: it means people in the lgbt community in hyattsville can now go to a restaurant, get an apartment and know they are protected by law. >> four jurisdictions, montgomery county, baltimore county and the city of baltimore. >> reporter: currently, 16 states in d.c. have statewide nondiscrimination laws. they hope what's happening in hyattsville sends a message to state legislatures. >> i think it's a big help. the civil rights act didn't end racism. i don't think this is going to end homophobia or transphobia. >> reporter: zachary kiesch, news 4. >>> right now at 6:00, d.c. mayor vincent gray talks up his administration
of religio religions. we have had muslims out here, catholics, christians out here to pay tribute to him. you are looking at a live picture of him. people are signing a condolence book inside the south african embas embassy. they will begin a prayer service each evening from 7:00 to 8:00 p.m. until tuesday evening. a memorial is being planned at the washington cathedral for next wednesday at 11:00 in the morning. another update at 5:00 and 6:00. i'm shomari stone, news 4. >>> former secretary of state, hillary clinton paid tribute as she accepted a human rights award on capitol hill. she called him a giant among us. >> someone who, by the power of his example demonstrated unequivocally how each of us can choose. how we will respond to those in justices and grievances, sorrows and tragedy that is afflict all of human kind. >> clinton said it was fitting he be remembered during a ceremony held for the late congressman tom lantos. you can read what former u.s. presidents and leaders are saying by going to www.nbcwashington.com. our web team compiled their statements. you can see photos of nelson
races and religion say mandela created that had unity. at an interfaith service, south africans celebrated the respect that mandela provided them. >> celebrate. it's an important model for human society. >> it lions us to be. >> down the road at an indian rally, man dela was thanked on behalf of children. 20 years ago, perussia was a second-class citizen. apartheid didn't only segregate blacks. >> we were part of the deprived lot. >> her husband suffered the same. he remembers being humiliated just for eating dinner. >> we used to go down in the evening to find something to eat. we had to say to the guy. sorry, do you sell to us? he would say, no we don't but you guys can go around the corner and you are more than welcome to buy take-aways. >> their kids have no idea what their parents went through, which is just fine for them. >> tell me about these. >> perussia shows off achievements she wasn't allowed to dream. her kids graduated from integrated colleges. one is a doctor, the other training to be a teacher. >> it's an awesome feel to go have brought up children in the multi-r
religion free from fear. so for manfred and millions like him, that place was ultimately america. he passed away last year. but during his life, he designed the special menorah with a model of the statue of liberty at the base of each candle. i don't know if you have noticed that. in a moment, all nine lady liberty's will be shining as a beacon of hope and freedom, wherever you come from, whatever your faith. it beacon stays bright because of families like the one that will join me in lighting the menorah this evening, the schwitters. dad, jake emma could not be here because he is deployed in afghanistan. [applause] joined by his wonderful wife drew, his daughters lanie and kylie. the head and wave, guys. [laughter] i want you to know how proud we are of not only your dad but also of you. thewe are so grateful sacrifices you make on behalf of our country original day. tonight, we give thanks to all the men and women in uniform and for their families who make tremendous sacrifices on our behalf. on behalf of our freedom and our security, not only of us but our allies and friends around the w
out of hand. you would not dismiss religion out of hand. religion has nothing to do with science, but it is something people believe very deeply. you have scientists arguing that the foods are safe and acceptable. on the other hand, you have people arguing on other grounds that even if the foods are safe -- and they are not willing to accept that they are -- but even if the foods are safe, they are not acceptable on other grounds. these two points of view go past each other with no meeting of the minds whatsoever. the academy was giving a vote to science-based look into genetically modified foods to say they are ok. other people would argue differently. would think labeling solve a lot of these problems than they should have been labeled from the beginning. let me say one other thing about that. the first company that was going to develop a genetically modified food was working on a gmo tomato. i have in my files at nyu copies of the label they intended to use on those products. a great big tomato with genetic modifications was right on the front saying this is the pride of calif
in south africa today. millions of people, regardless of their race, color, or religion, unified in prayer, song, and remembrance in honor of nelson mandela. today's national day of prayer and reflection marks the beginning of a week-long program of mourning in his memory. let's go right now to nbc's michelle koh zin ski, who's in the middle of it all. michelle, a good evening your time. what are we seeing? >> reporter: hi, alex. right here this was a fence lined with some flowers outside the mandela property. now it has become several large hills full of flowers lined with people. you can imagine in churches around the world today mandela was mentioned. here today people were basically encouraged to do their own thing, to reflect on the melgszage of this champion of freedom. but in enormous numbers, people felt much better gathering together, includingmembers of mandela's family. it had the feeling of a sunday revival. here a few hundred gathered in a tent at mandela's offices, anything but quietly reflective, full of joy. >> we don't mourn quiet. we need to celebrate. we need to celebrat
think back to the 1990's, various european countries in particular of standing with historic co-religion, the idea that catholic portions of europe were standing with the co-ops and others, the serbs because of old religious orders. i think we have all learned from that, so that was not completely accurate depiction of the 1990's that we have to be extraordinarily careful. we are all skirting around the proper ways or the ways of describing a very complex situation. the u.s. does not want to be seen in the middle of a sectarian conflict. it gets to the whole issue of the sunni-shiite divide, the role of christians, the role of other religious groups in the area, because this is obviously something that is three much focus on in the context of the middle east peace process, and we have to be extraordinarily careful about how we deal with that. this is why we are not seeing the same kind of tone of the debate in the u.s. they do not want to have a particular constituency. there are other dimensions of the that we want to mention about the refugee process. we've seen a whole slew of her spe
have identified whiidentify which people. owe 'people. this was his religion. >> we, you are absolutely right. even though he went through chechen prison, whenever people from different denominations came in, they obviously wanted to see him, so he would go and sit and listen very attentively. that was yet another of mandela's personas. >> as a politician, let's end with this. one of the most remarkable things was when there was a changeover in power, ordinarily, you wipe out who was there. especially under conditions like apartheid. how did he sell the idea of keeping africanos in government, how did he make that okay with the african people? >> i think personally at a fundamental level, he recognized that africanos were south africans just like everyone of us. that's a lessen he learned in prison and emphasized in prison. he had a cordial relationship and we learned from him. the most important message who to trust, please dobi don't be consumed by hatred. it no cusses on the wrong things. that's a message he carried outside of prison. amazing, he was able to carry huge numbers of peo
that jerusalem, the crucible of the world's three great monotheistic religions becomes non-not as the subject of constant struggle, but as the golden city of peace and unity embodied the aspirations of israelis and palestinians alike. peace is possible because we have courageous leaders who have already taken significant political risks for peace. the time is approaching when they will have to take even more . they have shown real courage, nd primesident abbas a minister netanyahu. the president has made tough choices. he has stayed the course, despite people in his team saying you ought to get out of here, look at those settlements, they are making a full of you. leave me, that battle has been going on. i deal with it every week. time, there has been israeli soldiers shot and killed and other actsk of incitement. prime minister netanyahu has made tough choices. just this week, he reaffirmed his commitment to a palestinian state. he said israel is ready for an historic peace. because possible today the arab league has also made tough choices. for the first time, they came to washington. they
and safeguards the freedoms of speech, press, and religion. as the u.s. attempted to encourage ashe nations to develop a transparent society they need to look no further than their democratic neighbor. i want to pause right there and again yield to my friend as we continue this conversation and move forward on why this matters and bringing up these ideas of a relationship that's deeply rooted in history and of mutual sharing and not one going seemingly behind the back of the other. mr. schneider: you talk about the relationship. as you noted, harry s. trow truman was the first -- harry s. truman was the first to recognize the state of israel after the british left. immediately upon its declaration of independence, israel was attacked by five nations. throughout its history, israel has faced hostility from its neighbors throughout the region. since 1973 in the yom kippur war, as a 12-year-old boy, i remember vividly coming out of synagogue that day, sitting in the back seat of my parents' car, listening to the radio, not knowing if israel was going to survive. it was an intiss ten rble threa
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12